#56896 Overall Influence

Devon A. Mihesuah

American writer

About

Why is this person notable and influential?

Devon A. Mihesuah (born 2 June 1957) is an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation, a historian and writer, and a previous editor of the American Indian Quarterly. She is the Cora Lee Beers Price Professor in the Humanities Program at the University of Kansas. She is the second Native woman to receive a named/distinguished professorship (the first is Henrietta Mann). Her lineage is well-documented in multiple tribal records. Mihesuah has written award-winning books and articles about colonization, boarding schools, stereotypes, research methodologies, Indigenous women, AIM, repatriation, racism, violence against Natives, “fake news,” slander and libel against Natives, in addition to a series of award-winning novels.

Awards:

  • Daniel F. Austin Award Presented by the Society for Economic Botany
  • Gourmand International’s World Cookbook Awards: Best Book Award for Arctic, University Press and Heritage Categories, 2020
  • High Country News’s “This Season’s Best Reads,” November 11, 2019
  • Literary Hub’s Best of University Press Books, 2019
  • EcoWatch’s Best Environmental Books of August 2019 for Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the U.S.: Restoring Cultural Knowledge, Protecting Environments, and Regaining Health
  • Oklahoma Writer’s Federation Trophy Award for Best Non-Fiction Book
  • Finalist, Oklahoma Book Award
  • Best of the Rest Law and Order History-True West Magazine, for Ned Christie: The Creation of an Outlaw and Cherokee Hero
  • Trophy Award for the Best Fiction Book of 2011 presented by the Oklahoma Writers’ Federation for Document of Expectations
  • Outstanding Book on Oklahoma History Award presented by the Oklahoma Historical Society for Choctaw Crime and Punishment, 1884-1907
  • Trophy Award for the Best Non-Fiction Book of 2009 presented by the Oklahoma Writers’ Federation for Choctaw Crime and Punishment, 1884-1907
  • Finalist, Oklahoma Book Award for Choctaw Crime and Punishment, 1884-1907
  • Special Award of the Jury of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards, for Recovering Our Ancestors’ Gardens: Indigenous Recipes and Guide to Diet and Fitness
  • Finalist for Best in the World Cookbook
  • Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers’ Best Research Book of the Year
  • Finalist, Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights
  • Arizona Writer’s Association Best Non-Fiction Book Honorable Mention for So You Want to Write About American Indians? A Guide for Scholars, Students and Writers
  • Finalist Oklahoma Book Awards, Grand Canyon Rescue
  • Oklahoma Writers’ Federation Trophy Award for Best Non-Fiction Book, American Indigenous Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism
  • Oklahoma Writers’ Federation Trophy Award for Young Adult Novel Award for Lost and Found
  • Arizona Writers’ Association Best Book of the Year, for Grand Canyon Rescue
  • Wordcrafters’ Circle of Native Writers
  • Journal Editor of the Year Award for the American Indian Quarterly, 2001
  • Oklahoma Writers’ Federation Trophy Award for Best Fiction Book for The Roads of My Relations
  • Critics’ Choice Award of the American Educational Studies Association for Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing About American Indians
  • Critics’ Choice Award from the American Educational Studies Association, for Cultivating the Rosebuds Mihesuah is also the recipient of awards from the American Council of Learned Societies, American Educational Studies Association, American Historical Association, Arizona Humanities Council, Flagstaff Live! Ford Foundation, KU Crystal Eagle American Indian Leadership Award, National Endowment for the Humanities, Newberry Library, Phi Alpha Theta, Smithsonian Institution, Westerners International, Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers. At NAU she received the Native American Students United Award for Outstanding Faculty, President’s Award for Outstanding Faculty, and Outstanding Faculty Woman of the Year Award.

Source

From Wikipedia

Devon Abbott Mihesuah is an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation, a historian and writer, and a previous editor of the American Indian Quarterly. She is the Cora Lee Beers Price Professor in the Humanities Program at the University of Kansas. She is the second Native woman to receive a named/distinguished professorship . Her lineage is well-documented in multiple tribal records. Her great, great, great grandfather signed the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. His son, Charles Wilson, served as sheriff and treasurer of Sugar Loaf County in Mushulatubbee District of the Choctaw Nation. His murder in 1884 is documented in Choctaw Crime and Punishment and Roads of my Relations. Her great grandfather, Thomas Abbott, created the blueprints for the town of McAlester, Oklahoma and his son, Thomas, served as Chief of Police. They are chronicled in "'Gentleman' Tom Abbott: Middleweight Champion of the Southwest," Chronicles of Oklahoma 68 : 426–437.

Source: Wikipedia

Published Works

Metadata from Crossref logo Metadata from Semantic Scholar

Other Resources

Schools

What schools is this person affiliated with?

University of Kansas

Public research university in Kansas, United States

Influence Rankings by Discipline

How’s this person influential?
#29484 World Rank
History
#42369 World Rank
Anthropology
#118035 World Rank
Communications
#180011 World Rank
Earth Sciences
#211218 World Rank
Philosophy
#249673 World Rank
Literature
#829443 World Rank
Psychology
#8693566 World Rank
Medical