Ei-ichi Negishi
#12168 Overall Influence

Ei-ichi Negishi

Japanese chemist

About

Why is this person notable and influential?

Negishi is the Herbert C. Brown Distinguished Professor and Director of the Negishi-Brown Institute at Purdue. Negishi received his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Tokyo in 1958. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania in 1963. Negishi won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2010, along with Richard F. Heck and Akira Suzuki.

Negishi is known for his discovery of the “Negishi coupling,” an important reaction that forms carbon-carbon bonds. The Negishi coupling has important applications for the synthesis of natural products. Negishi coupling has been investigated also for its use in medical applications such as in the treatment of asthma.

Negishi is world-renowned as a chemist. He has won numerous awards for his career in chemistry, including the Noble Prize in Chemistry in 2010. Negishi also received Japan’s high honors, in both the Chemical Society of Japan Award and the Order of Culture, in 1997 and 2010, respectively. Negishi became a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011. The following year he became Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Academic Website

Featured in Top Influential Chemists Today

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Schools

What schools is this person affiliated with?
Hokkaido University
Hokkaido University

National university in Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

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University of Tokyo
University of Tokyo

National research university in Tokyo, Japan

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University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania

Private research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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Syracuse University
Syracuse University

University located in Syracuse, New York, United States

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Purdue University
Purdue University

Public research university in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

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Influence Rankings by Discipline

How’s this person influential?
#384 World Rank #127 USA Rank
Chemistry