Top Influential Chemists Today

Today, the scientific inquiry around chemistry remains essential to improving our way of life through technological innovations, medical breakthroughs, and yet deeper insights into our bodies, minds, and the universe which surrounds us. That covers a lot of ground, which means that, whether you know it or not, the Most Influential People in Chemistry over the last decade (2010-2020) have had a profound impact on your world. These scholars, educators, and chemists are responsible for the most important findings, developments, and innovations in chemistry today.

Top Influential Chemists Today
By Dr. Erik J. Larson

Chemistry is, quite literally, the study of everything around us. This physical science explores the properties of matter, the way substances interact, and how energy is created. Chemistry is the study of the elements, compounds, and molecular composition. There is chemistry in everything we do, from cooking and cleaning to driving and digesting our meals.

Chemistry is sometimes referred to as the Central Science because so many of its principles and concepts are foundational to nearly every other basic and applied science. Chemistry lends critical knowledge to the fields of biology, physics, and geology. It informs our understanding of ecology, environmental sciences, mechanical engineering. It is inextricable from the fields of human pathology, genetic research, and astrophysics. Chemistry is, simply stated, a cornerstone of scientific inquiry, discovery, and understanding.

Ironically, chemistry’s origins are in a field best known to modern readers for its dubious efforts at transforming noble metals into gold and concocting a so-called elixir of immortality. The practice of alchemy proliferated widely throughout the ancient world, particularly through Greek and Egyptian influence. At once a philosophy, a spiritual orientation, and a protoscience dedicated to the purification of certain materials, alchemy would ultimately give rise to the true science of chemistry.

In what follows, we look at influential chemists over the last decade. Based on our ranking methodology, these individuals have significantly impacted the academic discipline of chemistry within 2010-2020. Influence can be produced in a variety of ways. Some have had revolutionary ideas, some may have climbed by popularity, but all are academicians primarily working in chemistry. Read more about our methodology.

Top Influential Chemists 2010-2020

Want more? Discover influential chemists throughout history:
Of All Time | Last 50 Years | Last 20 Years

Note: The links above take you to rankings that dynamically change as our AI learns new things!

1. Jean-Pierre Sauvage

Jean-Pierre Sauvage
Jean-Pierre Sauvage
(1944 -   )
Paris, France

University of Strasbourg Institute for Advanced Study, National Center for Scientific Research

Chair of Chemical Topolgy and Molecular Machines, Director Emeritus

Supramolecular Chemistry, Coordination Chemistry

Sauvage is Director Emeritus of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France. Sauvage received his Ph.D. from Louis Pasteur University (now part of the University of Strasbourg) in 1971. Sauvage was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford for two years, and taught at the University of Strasbourg as Professor of Chemistry along with his position as Director of Research at CNRS for many years. In 2016, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on molecular machines.

Sauvage’s work focuses on what’s called “supramolecular chemistry,” a subfield that concerns chemical systems with a discrete number of molecules. In particular, Sauvage works on creating molecules that mimic the function of machines, by varying their output depending on inputs. DNA replication and ATP synthesis are performed by similar structures, known as macromolecular machines. Sauvage won the Nobel Prize for providing a key step towards molecular machines when he synthesized two molecules that are interlocked and move mechanically (rather than chemically). Sauvage also performs core research on the processes involved in photosynthesis and reductions of carbon dioxide.

In addition to winning the Nobel Prize, Sauvage was elected a correspondent member of the French Academy of Sciences in 1990.

Academic Website

2. Ada Yonath

Ada Yonath
Ada Yonath
(1939 -   )
Jerusalem, Israel

Weizmann Institute of Science, The Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly

The Martin S. and Helen Kimmel Professor of Structural Biology, Director

Crystallography

Yonath is Director of the Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly of the Weizmann Institute of Science. She received her bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1962, her master’s in biochemistry in 1964, and her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1968.

Yonath is a crystallographer, a branch of chemistry that studies the arrangement of atoms in crystalline solids. Yonath has applied crystallographic techniques to the study of the ribosome, which has resulted in pioneering research in that area. In 2009, Yonath won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on the structure and function of the ribosome (along with two colleagues). She became the first Israeli woman ever to win the Nobel Prize.

Yonath has held postdoctoral positions at Carnegie Mellon University and MIT. She founded the first protein crystallography laboratory in Israel, has been visiting Professor at the University of Chicago, and also directed a Max-Plank Institute Research Unit in Hamburg Germany. In addition to the Nobel Prize, Yonath won the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 2006, and many other awards during her long and distinguished career.

Academic Website

3. Fraser Stoddart

Fraser Stoddart
Fraser Stoddart
(1942 -   )
Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom

Northwestern University

Professor of Chemistry

Supramolecular Chemistry, Nanotechnology

Stoddart is Board of Trustees Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University in the United States. He is also Head of the Stoddart Mechanostereochemistry Group in the Department of Chemistry. Stoddart received his bachelor’s degree as well as his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Edinburgh in 1967.

Stoddart’s research focuses on supramolecular chemistry and nanotechnology. Nanotechnology has entered popular culture because of its exciting possibilities for the fabrication of products at the molecular level, such as materials or miniature devices. Stoddart has performed core research in development on nanotechnologies, including an important class of nanotech known as nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

Stoddart won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2016 for the design of molecular machines, work he shared with colleagues Ben Feringa and Jean-Pierre Sauvage. In 2006, he was appointed Knight Bachelor by Queen Elizabeth II. He received the Albert Einstein World Award of Science in 2007. Stoddart is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London (1994) and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Academic Website

4.Eric Scerri

Eric Scerri
Eric Scerri
(1953 -   )
Malta

University of California at Los Angeles

Lecturer

Philosophy of Chemistry, Chemistry Education

Scerri is Lecturer at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He is also Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Foundations of Chemistry, a triannual a peer-reviewed academic journal. Scerri is widely acknowledged as an authority on the Periodic Table, appearing in the PBS documentary The Mystery of Matter. He received his bachelor’s of science degree from Westfield College, the University of London, his MPhil from the University of Southampton and his Ph.D. from King’s College London.

Scerri is a chemist but also a noted historian and philosopher of chemistry. In particular, his work on the Periodic Table has crossed disciplines, and he has worked on conceptual problems involving the reduction of chemistry to quantum mechanics (typically considered part of the philosophy of science). In 2015, Scerri was appointed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) to make a recommendation on the composition of “Group 3” in the periodic table, selecting the elements that should be included. Scerri’s latest book, published in 2020, is titled The Periodic Table, Its Story and Its Significance.

Academic Website

Professional Website

5.Omar M. Yaghi

Omar M. Yaghi
Omar M. Yaghi
(1965 -   )
Amman, Jordan

University of California, Berkeley

James and Neeltje Tretter Chair Professor of Chemistry

Reticular Chemistry

Yaghi is the James and Neeltje Tretter Chair Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. Yaghi received his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the State University of New York-Albany in 1985, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1990. He was then a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University for two years, working with the chemist Richard Holm.

Yaghi is widely considered the pioneer of reticular chemistry, a branch of chemistry concerned with combining molecular building blocks together to synthesize new compounds and materials. Such products have proven beneficial in clean energy technologies such as hydrogen and methane storage.

Yaghi is the second most cited chemist in the world! He has received awards for the design and synthesis of important materials by the American Chemical Society as well as industry giants like Exxon, notably with the Solid State Chemistry Award. The American Association for the Advancement of Science awarded him the Newcomb Cleveland Prize, and he won the Chemistry of Materials Award from the American Chemical Society in 2009. As if these weren’t enough, the World Cultural Council awarded the Albert Einstein World Award of Science. He also received the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 2018.

Academic Website

6.George C. Schatz

George C. Schatz
George C. Schatz
(1949 -   )

Northwestern University

Morrison Professor of Chemistry

Reaction Dynamics

George C. Schatz is a theoretical chemist, editor-in-chief at the Journal of Physical Chemistry, and the Morrison Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University. He earned his B.S. from Clarkson University and his Ph.D. from Caltech. He completed his post-doctoral work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, investigating chemical reaction kinetics.

His research specialty is in the field of reaction dynamics. One of the top theoretical chemists, he has conducted groundbreaking research into the computational modeling of the optical properties of nanoparticles, including how gold and silver nanoparticles absorb light. This work has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of illnesses such as Alzheimer’s Disease, through the use of biosensors.

He credits his success to having had the opportunity to explore multiple fields of inquiry, allowing for a top-down interdisciplinary approach that opens up new possibilities.

Schatz has produced an impressive body of work, with over 900 scientific publications including his book: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry. He has been honored with the Ahmed Zewail Prize, an international award recognizing contributions to Chemical Physics.

He is a member of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science and the National Academy of Sciences. His research work today focuses primarily on nanotechnology and bionanotechnology.

Academic Website

7.Paul Anastas

Paul Anastas
Paul Anastas
(1962 -   )

Yale University, Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering

Teresa and H. John Heinz III Professor in the Practice of Chemistry for the Environment, Director

Green Chemistry

Anastas is Director of Yale University’s Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering. He is known as the “Father of Green Chemistry” for his work on the design and development of safe and environmentally-friendly chemicals. Anastas earned his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts at Boston and his master’s and Ph.D. in Chemistry from Brandeis University.

Anastas is at the forefront of the “green movement” seeking non-hazardous and environmentally friendly chemicals from design to manufacture and use. He coined the term “Green Chemistry,” in fact, and his career dedicated to its research and development has earned him prestigious positions in government and in academia. For instance, Anastas has served as Science Advisor to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as well as the EPA’s Assistant Administrator for Research and Development, a position appointed by former President Barack Obama. He also served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1999-2004. In industry, he co-founded the chemical company P2 Science (2011), and Catalytic Innovations and Inkemia Green Chemicals, both in 2017.

Anastas has published ten books on chemistry, notably Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice, co-authored with chemist John Warner. He has received numerous awards, including the US Environmental Protection Agency Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017, as well as the Green Chemistry Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry, in 2016.

Academic Website

8.George M. Whitesides

George M. Whitesides
George M. Whitesides
(1939 -   )
Louisville, KY, USA

Harvard University

Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor

Organic Chemistry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Whitesides is Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor at Harvard University. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree at Harvard College in 1960, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1964. A prolific researcher, Whitesides earned the highest Hirsch index rating of all living chemists in 2011, an index that attempts to measure the productivity and impact of scholars by analyzing their publications.

Whitesides focuses on organic chemistry, and has performed core research using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a powerful technique for investigating the nuclei of atoms. Whitesides has also done extensive work on polymers, large molecules with many subparts, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as well as Harvard University. His recent interests are in physical and organic chemistry, materials science, topics in complexity and emergence, and many other aspects of chemistry and cognate fields. At Harvard, Whitesides is co-founder and director of the (appropriately named) Whitesides Research Group at Harvard. He is also known for his having played a “pivotal role” in the development of the Corey-House-Posner-Whitesides reaction (also known as the Corey-House synthesis, a much more manageable title!), a major development in chemistry. The Corey-House reaction is an organic reaction involving several molecules. It is a powerful tool for synthesizing new complex organic molecules.

Whitesides won the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry in 1995.

Academic Website

9.Harry B. Gray

Harry B. Gray
Harry B. Gray
(1935 -   )
Woodburn, KY, USA

California Institute of Technology

Arnold O. Beckman Professor of Chemistry

Inorganic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Electron Transfer Chemistry

Gray is the Arnold O. Beckman Professor of Chemistry at California Institute of Technology. Gray received his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from Western Kentucky University in 1957. He earned a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Northwestern University in 1960.

Gray’s research focuses on topics in inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, and biophysics, the latter an exciting discipline that seeks to apply concepts and techniques from physics to biology (as you might expect, biophysics overlaps importantly with chemistry, as well). Gray has focused especially on the dynamics of Electron Transfer (ET) chemistry. He and his group have extensively investigated issues in ET such as how protein radicals accelerate long-range electronic transfer.

Gray was the National Medal of Science in 1986. In addition, Gray received the coveted Priestly Medal in 1991, and the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 2004. The Wolf Prize recognized his groundbreaking work in the field of bioinorganic chemistry, a subfield dedicated to examining the role of metals in biology. The field includes the study of naturally occurring phenomena such as metalloproteins, as well as artificially introduced metals.

Academic Website

10.Lesley Yellowlees

Lesley Yellowlees
Lesley Yellowlees
(1953 -   )
London, England, UK

University of Edinburgh

Professor of Inorganic Electrochemistry

Inorganic Electrochemistry, Solar Cell Chemistry

Yellowlees is Professor of Inorganic Electrochemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. She is the first woman elected to head of chemistry at Edinburgh. She is also Head of the College of Science and Engineering. Yellowlees received her bachelor’s degree (BsC) in Chemical Physics at the University of Edinburgh in 1975, and finished her Ph.D. in Inorganic Electrochemistry at Edinburgh in 1982.

Yellowlees’ career has focused on important areas of inorganic chemistry, including work on solar cell chemistry and electrochemical research. She became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2005 as well as an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2015. In 2014, she was included in the BBC’s 100 Women, a series highlighting the role of women in the 21st century.

Academic Website

11.Jean-Marie Lehn

Jean-Marie Lehn
Jean-Marie Lehn
(1939 -   )
Rosheim, France

University of Strasbourg’s Institute of Advanced Study

Professor of Chemistry

Organic Chemistry, Supramolecular Chemistry

Lehn is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Strasbourg’s Institute of Advanced Study (USIAS), as well as Chair of Chemistry of Complex Systems. He is also a member of the Reliance Innovation Council of Reliance Industries Limited, India. Lehn studied philosophy and chemistry at the University of Strasbourg, receiving his undergraduate degree in chemistry, and later his Ph.D.

Lehn’s interests are primarily in organic chemistry, where he has explored supramolecular chemistry, or the study of how multiple molecules can lock or combine—in fact, the term “supramolecular” is due to Lehn. His early work focused on synthesizing vitamin B12, and his later investigations led to his discovery of “cryptands,” or cage-like molecules that have a cavity that can house another molecule. Lehn received the Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking work in chemistry in 1987.

Along with the Nobel Prize, Lehn has received a number of prestigious honors and awards during his exciting career. He became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1993. In 1997, he received the Davy Award, named after 19th century chemist Humphry Davy, for his work in chemistry.

Academic Website

12.Itamar Willner

Itamar Willner
Itamar Willner
( -   )

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Professor of Chemistry

Nanotechnology, Supramolecular Chemistry

Itamar Willner is a Professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a chemist. He earned his Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

His research interests are broad. He has studied molecular self-assembly, electronics and photophysics of nanoparticles and quantum dots, optobioelectronics, artificial photosynthesis, supramolecular chemistry, nanotechnology, nanobiotechnology, photoinduced electron transfer and more.

He has published more than 700 papers and holds 30 patents. His most recent publications have been Rational Design of Supramolecular Hemin-G-Quadruplex- Dopamine Aptamer Nucleoapzyme Systems with Superior Catalytic Performance and Application of the Hybridization Chain Reaction on Electrodes for the Amplified and Multiplexed Electrochemical Analysis of DNA.

Willner has been honored with numerous prestigious awards, including the Max Planck Research Award for International Cooperation, the Klachky Family Prize for the Advancement of the Frontiers of Science, and was named one of the World’s Most Highly Cited and Influential Scientific Minds in both 2014 and 2015.

He is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences, the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

His current research group is working on DNA machines for biosensing, biomolecule-based computing, and functional polymers.

Academic Website

13.Robert H. Grubbs

Robert H. Grubbs
Robert H. Grubbs
(1942-   )
Possum Trot, KY, USA

California Institute of Technology

Victor and Elizabeth Atkins Professor of Chemistry

Organometallic chemistry

Grubbs is the Victor and Elizabeth Atkins Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He received his bachelor of science in Chemistry at the University of Florida in 1963. He received his master’s degree from Florida in 1965. Grubbs got his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia University in New York City in 1968.

Grubbs’s work in Chemistry has focused on organometallic chemistry, a relatively new field at the time of his initial research efforts in the late 1960s. He is also a specialist in synthetic chemistry, an exciting field that studies the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds. His work has important application for the creation of polymers, pharmaceuticals, and petrochemicals. He is known for developing a family of catalysts, one of which bears his name: the Grubbs catalyst.

Grubbs won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2005, along with Richard R. Schrock and Yves Chauvin. In addition, Grubbs became a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1989 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. In 2009, he became Fellow of the American Chemical Society.

Academic Website

14.Thomas Maschmeyer

Thomas Maschmeyer
Thomas Maschmeyer
(1966 -   )

University of Sydney

Professor of Chemistry

Catalysis, Sustainable Processes, Green Chemistry

Maschmeyer is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Sydney, Australia. He is also Founding Director of the Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. Maschmeyer is known for his research on catalysis, sustainable processes, and renewable feedstocks (biomass, solar, and hydrogen). In addition, he also performs research on important areas such as nanostructured materials and reversible energy storage devices.

Maschmeyer has authored numerous articles and several books. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of New South Wales. In 2011 he was elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science.

Academic Website

15.Gregory D. Scholes

Gregory D. Scholes
Gregory D. Scholes
(-   )

Princeton University

William S. Tod Professor of Chemistry

Photosynthesis, Quantum biology

Gregory D. Scholes is the William S. Tod Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University and Deputy Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. He studied at Imperial College London and University of California at Berkeley.

With the Scholes Group, he studies photobiomodulation medicine, solar energy conversion, excitonic materials, and photosynthesis. They have also recently been using coherence spectroscopies to investigate the characteristics of coherence phenomena.

His current research interests include the study of how chemical systems may behave with unexpected quantum information, the use of short laser pulses to drive coherent states and reveal ultrafast processes. He is also studying light-induced functions of photosynthetic proteins and nanoscale systems.

In addition to his teaching and scientific research endeavors, Scholes is also an adjunct professor at the Beijing Institute of Technology and the Director of the Energy Frontier Research Center BioLEC (Bio-inspired Light-Escalated Chemistry). He is also a senior fellow for the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

He has contributed to a number of important research works in his field, including “Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature”, “Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting”, and “Light absorption and energy transfer in the antenna complexes of photosynthetic organisms”.

Academic Website

16.Carolyn Bertozzi

Carolyn Bertozzi
Carolyn Bertozzi
(1966 -   )
Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Stanford University

Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor

Biorthogonal Chemistry, Glycobiology

Carolyn Bertozzi is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, and is an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She earned a B.A. in chemistry from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Bertozzi is the founder of biorthogonal chemistry, a subfield of chemistry that allows scientists to modify molecules in living organisms without disrupting processes occurring within the cells. She has also worked extensively to study how viruses can bind to sugars, known as glycobiology. Her work on the interactions of sugar within the body, and diseases such as arthritis, tuberculosis and cancer, have yielded critical insights with implications across medical specialties.

She has also provided important leadership in the field. She is founder or co-founder of companies such as Thios Pharmaceuticals, Redwood Bioscience, Enable Biosciences, Palleon Pharma, InterVenn Biosciences, Grace Science Foundation, OliLux Biosciences and Lycis Therapeutics.

She has over 600 research publications, including “Bioorthogonal Chemistry: Fishing for Selectivity in a Sea of Functionality”, and “Glycans in cancer and inflammation—potential for therapeutics and diagnostics”.

Bertozzi was most recently honored with the John J. Carty Award for the Advancement of Science and the Chemistry for the Future Solvay Prize.

Academic Website

17.Allen J. Bard

Allen J. Bard
Allen J. Bard
(1933 -   )
New York, New York, USA

University of Texas at Austin

Hackerman-Welch Regents Chair Professor

Electrochemistry

Allen J. Bard is a chemist and the Hackerman-Welch Regents Chair Professor and director of the Center for Electrochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. He studied at the City College of New York before earning a Master’s degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Bard has spent his entire career at the University of Texas at Austin but has served appointments at Cornell University and as the Robert Burns Woodward visiting professor for Harvard University. Known as the “father of modern electrochemistry”, Bard has made substantial contributions to the field. He developed the scanning electrochemical microscope, co-discovered electrochemiluminescence, and made advancements in our understanding of the photoelectrochemistry of semiconductor electrodes.

With more than 1000 research works to his credit, Bard has written three books about electrochemistry. His textbook, Electrochemical Methods – Fundamentals and Applications is known as the standard text on the topic. So much so in fact that students refer to the text as “the Bard.”

At his Center for Electrochemistry, he worked with his colleagues to create light using electrochemistry. This work has been instrumental in the development of new testing and treatment options.

Widely recognized for his work, Bard has been awarded the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, the Priestly Medal, the National Medal of Science, and most recently, the King Faisal International Prize in Chemistry.

Academic Website

18.Charles M. Lieber

Charles M. Lieber
Charles M. Lieber
(1959 -   )
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Harvard University

Joshua and Beth Friedman University Professor

Nanoscience, Nanotechnoogy

Charles M. Lieber is co-founder of Nanosys and Vista Therapeutics, a pioneer in nanoscience and nanotechnology and a chemist. He earned a B.A. in chemistry from Franklin & Marshall College before earning his Ph.D. from Stanford University. He completed a two-year postdoctoral program at Caltech, where he studied long-distance electron transfer in metalloproteins.

Lieber has made critically important contributions to our understanding of nanomaterials, rational growth and synthesis. His nanoscience work has had applications in fields such biology, medicine, computing and electronics, among others.

He has most recently been working on integrations between nanoelectronics and brain science. For this research he works to map activity within the brain and to study how electronics could be non-invasively integrated with the central nervous system.

He has been widely recognized for his work. He has been the recipient of the Wolf Prize in Chemistry and Nano Research Award, the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the Welch Award in Chemistry.

In recent days, Lieber is facing significant professional challenges. He was arrested by the federal government and charged with making false statements regarding his work with China’s Thousand Talent Program, which is affiliated with the controversial Wuhan University of Technology. He has been placed on leave by Harvard University until the situation resolves.

Academic Website

19.Robert Curl

Robert Curl
Robert Curl
(1933 -   )
Alice, Texas, USA

Rice University

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus, Pitzer–Schlumberger Professor of Natural Sciences Emeritus

Buckminsterfullerene

Curl is the Pitzer–Schlumberger Professor of Natural Sciences Emeritus, and Professor of Chemistry Emeritus at Rice University. Curl received his Bachelor of Science degree from Rice University (then the Rice Institute) in 1954. He got his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1957. Curl won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996 for his groundbreaking work on nanomaterials.

Curl’s research, especially his earlier work, focused on the use of microwave spectroscopy to analyze chemical compounds. This work led to his analysis of free radicals, an important area touching on many applications. Later, Curl analyzed large carbon chains occurring in red giant stars, work that led to his groundbreaking discovery of buckminsterfullerene, named after the structures created by architect Buckminster Fuller. His discovery has spurred interest in nanomaterials as well as molecular scale electronics. In later years Curl has worked on physical chemistry, including DNA sequencing, as well as exciting new technologies like quantum cascade lasers, semiconductor lasers that emit in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

In addition to his Nobel Prize in Chemistry (which he shared with chemists Richard Smalley of Rice University and Harold Kroto of the University of Sussex), Curl has is the recipient of many awards and distinctions for his outstanding work in Chemistry. He became Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences in 1997, and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1998. Curl won the International Prize for New Materials from the American Physical Society in 1992.

In 2001, he was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. His work was recognized as National Historic Chemical Landmark of the American Chemical Society in 2010, an honor bestowed for research that represents a significant landmark in the field of Chemistry.

Academic Website

20.Martyn Poliakoff

Martyn Poliakoff
Martyn Poliakoff
(1947 -   )
London, England, UK

University of Nottingham

Research Professor

Green Chemistry

Martyn Poliakoff is a research professor in the chemistry department at the University of Nottingham. He attended Westminster School before earning a bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. from King’s College in Cambridge.

Best known for his video series, The Periodic Table of Videos, Poliakoff is a leading researcher in green chemistry, with a particular focus on supercritical fluids. His video series features more than 600 videos discussing the various elements of the periodic table, and more recently, molecules and other chemistry topics.

He has received numerous honors in the field, including the Meldola Medal and Prize and the Nyholm Prize. He is a fellow of the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Institution of Chemical Engineers, and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He was named an Associate Fellow of the Ethiopian Academy of Sciences.

In 2008, he was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his substantial contributions to the field of chemistry. Most recently, he was honored with the Royal Society of London Michael Faraday Prize and the Longstaff Prize.

He has provided critical leadership as well, serving in leadership positions for the Royal Society and through his work with the Advisory Council for the Campaign for Science and Engineering.

Academic Website

21.Robert Bergman

Robert Bergman
Robert Bergman
(1942 -   )
Chicago, Illinois, USA

University of California, Berkeley

Gerald E. K. Branch Distinguished Professor Of Chemsitry, Emeritus

Green Chemistry

Robert Bergman is the Gerald E. K. Branch Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley and a researcher at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Carleton College and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He completed his post-doctoral research at Columbia University.

Bergman’s work in organic chemistry has yielded important insights into the thermal cyclization of cis-1, 5-hexadiyne-3-ene to 4, 4-dehydrobenzene diradicals – a process which is now known as Bergman cyclization. He has also studied the synthesis of organometallic compounds and their reactions to transition metals such as metal-oxygen and metal-nitrogen.

Bergman’s work began gaining attention and recognition before he even graduated, receiving a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Teacher-Scholar Award. He has received a number of awards for his work, including the American Chemical Society’s Award in Organometallic Chemistry, the Arthur C. Cope Award, a National Institutes of Health Merit Award, the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry and a Wolf Prize in Chemistry.

He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the California Academy of Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Academic Website

22.Akira Yoshino

Akira Yoshino
Akira Yoshino
(1948 -   )
Suita, Osaka Prefecture, Japan

Meijo University of Nagoya

Professor

Electrochemistry

Akira Yoshino is a professor at Meijo University of Nagoya and a fellow of Asahi Kasei Corporation. He earned a B.S. and M.S. in engineering from Kyoto University and a doctorate from Osaka University. A future Nobel Laureate himself, Yoshino was a student of Kenichi Fukui, the first Asian to win a Nobel Prize in chemistry.

Yoshino has worked at Asahi Kasei since his early graduate work began at Kyoto University. He has devoted much of his research and development efforts to energy storage, particularly through lithium ion batteries. He assisted with the creation of rechargeable batteries, a technology afforded to us by our understanding of polyacetylene, which is an electroconductive polymer used as an anode. His work led to the early versions of today’s lithium-ion battery. He eventually created the first production-ready version of the lithium-ion battery, which powers cell phones and computers today.

He is also credited with the development of the aluminum foil current collector, which is a low-cost safety feature necessary for reducing voltage loss.

Yoshino was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with his colleagues, John B. Goodenough and M. Stanley Whittingham. He has also been recognized with a Medal with Purple Ribbon from the Japanese government, the IEEE Medal for Environmental and Safety Technologies, the Japan Prize and the 2019 Order of Culture.

Academic Website

23.Ben Feringa

Ben Feringa
Ben Feringa
(1951 -   )
Barger-Compascuum, Netherlands

Stratingh Institute for Chemistry, University of Groningen, Netherlands

Jacobus van ’t Hoff Distinguished Professor of Molecular Sciences

Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Photochemistry

Feringa is Jacobus van ’t Hoff Distinguished Professor of Molecular Sciences at the Stratingh Institute for Chemistry, the University of Groningen, Netherlands. He is also Academy Professor and Chair of Board of the Science Division of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. Feringa shares the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Stoddart and Sauvage (listed earlier) for work on molecular machines.

Feringa has a master’s in science (MSc) in Chemistry from the University of Groningen in 1974. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Groningen in 1978. Feringa’s work on photochemistry has led to important advances in light-driven molecular motors. The first nanocar—a molecular “vehicle” driven by light impulses—resulted from Feringa’s important work in chemistry. Feringa’s discovery was selected by the Chinese Academy of Sciences as one of the 10 major discoveries in science in the world.

Feringa holds over 30 patents and has written over 650 papers! Feringa is a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences.

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24.Tobin J. Marks

Tobin J. Marks
Tobin J. Marks
(1944 -   )

Northwestern University

Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Catalytic Chemistry, Professor of Material Science and Engineering

Materials Science, Polymer Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry

Tobin J. Marks is the Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Catalytic Chemistry and a Professor of Material Science and Engineering at the Department of Chemistry at Northwestern University. He earned his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Maryland College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences. He went on to earn a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Aside from his teaching and mentorship responsibilities, Marks has studied with the fields of materials chemistry, polymer chemistry, superconductivity, organometallic chemistry, and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. He leads the Marks Group, which is divided into four teams devoted to subfields within the discipline. Through the coordinated research efforts of these groups, important discoveries have been made regarding interactions between metals and chemicals.

He has been recognized with numerous awards, including the Harvey Prize in Science & Technology, the Tannas Award in Materials Science, the Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson Medal, and the Gabor A. Somorjai Award for Creative Research in Catalysis. He is a member of the US National Academy of Inventors and the US National Academy of Engineering, and a foreign fellow of the Indian National Academy of Sciences, the Chinese Chemical Society and the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei Italian National Academy of Sciences.

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25.Sumio Iijima

Sumio Iijima
Sumio Iijima
(1939 -   )
Koshigaya, Saitama, Japan

Meijo University

University Professor

Nanotechnology

Sumio Iijima is a University Professor at Meijo University, a physicist and inventor, best known for inventing carbon nanotubes. He earned a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the University of Electro-Communications and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in solid-state physics from Tohoku University.

His research and development work has focused on electron microscopy, crystalline and carbon materials, and ultra-fine particles. His discovery of carbon nanotubes occurred in 1991. Carbon nanotubes had been previously observed, but he was the first to understand what they were.

In 2017, he was awarded the Inaugural Platinum Medal from Indian Association of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. He has also received the Kavli Prize in Nanoscience, the Balzan Prize, the Fujihara Award, and the Gregori Aminoff Prize. In 2002, he was recognized with the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics for his work on carbon nanotubes and atomic structure.

He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, The Japan Society of Applied Physics and the Microscopy Society of America.

He has been a prolific researcher, working with organizations such as the Nanotube Research Center, the SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, the World Class University Program at Sunkyunkwan University, and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology.

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